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File #: 2020-0210    Version:
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 6/23/2020 In control: Mobility and Environment Committee
On agenda: Final action: 9/15/2020
Enactment date: 9/25/2020 Enactment #: 19161
Title: AN ORDINANCE relating to the sale of heat energy transferred to or from the King County wastewater treatment system and authorizing the King County executive to enter into up to three agreements for such sewage heat recovery projects.
Sponsors: Rod Dembowski, Jeanne Kohl-Welles
Indexes: Energy, Executive, Sewage, Wastewater
Attachments: 1. Ordinance 19161, 2. 2020-0210_Amendment_Dembowski_prevailing_wage bar, 3. A. Agreement for Sale and Use of Thermal Energy from King County Wastewater, dated September 9, 2020, revised 9/15/20, 4. A. Agreement for Sale and Use of Thermal Energy from King County Wastewater, dated September 9, 2020, 5. A. Agreement for Sale and Use of Thermal Energy from King County Wastewater, 6. 2020-0210 Copy of Sewer Heat Recovery- Fiscal Note, 7. 2020-0210 Revised Sewer Heat Recovery Transmittal Letter 6.11.20, 8. 2020-0210 Signed Revised Sewer Heat Recovery Transmittal Letter 6.11.20, 9. 2020-0210 Legislative Review Form, 10. 2020-0210_SR_sewer_heat.docx, 11. 2020-0210_ATT2_Striker.docx, 12. 2020-0210_ATT3_T1.docx, 13. 2020-0210_ATT4_redline_striker.docx, 14. 2020-0210_ATT4A_redline_contract_dated_Sept_9.docx
Staff: Reed, Mike
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AN ORDINANCE relating to the sale of heat energy transferred to or from the King County wastewater treatment system and authorizing the King County executive to enter into up to three agreements for such sewage heat recovery projects.
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STATEMENT OF FACTS:
1. Wastewater contains heat energy as it flows through pipelines to the treatment plant, and can be both a source of heat for buildings and a sink for unwanted heat from buildings.
2. Warm and hot wastewater flushed from homes and businesses is a significant source of energy. One estimate is that Americans flush three hundred fifty billion kilowatt-hours of energy into the sewers each year, roughly enough to power thirty million U.S. homes.
3. Recovery of heat energy from wastewater is consistent with the wastewater treatment division's mission to recover resources from wastewater.
4. Use of this renewable heat energy reduces use of fossil fuels for heating and cooling, contributing to efforts to reduce the region's carbon footprint, consistent with King County's Strategic Climate Action Plan, and supports countywide greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets adopted as Countywide Planning Policies by the King County Growth Management Planning Council in 2014.
5. Sewer heat transfer is an established technology in other countries, including Canada, and is a developing market in the United States with interest from private property owners in King County as a potential solution for delivering cost-efficient, environmentally responsible heating and cooling in buildings.
6. Sale of this previously unused heat energy resource provides an opportunity to generate modest but new funding, which can be used to further carbon emission reduction projects within the wastewater treatment division.
7. The unique nature and complexity of determining if, when and where a sewer heat transfer might be a useable energy option for a given user demonstrates that sewer heat does not lend itself to a sale to the high...

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